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Showing posts with label prose. Show all posts
Showing posts with label prose. Show all posts

Wednesday, 14 November 2018

Lonely Days by Bayo Adebowale

Lonely Days by Bayo Adebowale.

                                           Lonely Days by Bayo Adebowale.
Lonely Days is a prose work written by Bayo Adebowale. It is a story that exposes the bad customs and traditional rites widows are forced to go through in Africa.
The author exposes this evil tradition by telling us the story of Yaremi and other widows of Kufi village who go through harrowing and painful experiences at the death of their spouse.
Subject Matter : The major issue of discourse is death and the author particularly looks at widowhood in Africa focusing on the fate or sufferings of widows who are accused of being the ones responsible for their husbands death.
The novelist also sheds light on the loneliness and neglect that widows in Africa have to battle with as they are abandoned by family members and their children.

Author: Bayo Adebowale.                  
Country: Nigeria.
Language: English.                          
First Published: 2006
ISBN: 978-978-029-746-6
Pages: 141 (Spectrum Edition)          
Chapters: 14
Genre: Prose.

1) ABOUT AUTHOR
Bayo Adebowale (born 6 June, 1944) is a Nigerian poet, prolific writer, novelist, professor, critic, librarian and founder of the African Heritage Library and Cultural Centre, Adeyipo, Ibadan Oyo State.

Early life
He was born on 6 June 1944 in Ibadan, the capital of Oyo State, southwestern Nigeria into the family of Akangbe Adebowale, who was a farmer. He was educated at Secondary Modern School at Ibadan, where he obtained the West African School Certificate in 1958 before he proceeded to St Peter’s Teacher College where he received the Grade III certificate in education in 1961, the same year he was admitted into Baptist College in Ede for a Grade II Teacher certificate. On October 1971, he proceeded to the University of Ibadan, where he obtained a Bachelor of Arts (B. A) degree in English Language in 1974 and completed the compulsory National Youth Service Corps in 1975, the same year he joined the services of the Western State Public Service Commission as education officer before he later became an English instructor at Government Trade Centre, Oyo State. Three years later (1978), he obtained a master's degree in English language, the same year he joined the Oyo State College of Education as Lecturer I and was later transferred to the Polytechnic of Ibadan, where he rose to the position of Deputy Rector between 1999 and 2003 having obtained a doctorate degree (Ph. D) in Literature in English from the University of Ilorin in 1997.

2)STUDY GUIDE

Setting
Though set in the rural rustic village of Kufi, Lonely Days mirrors the plight of widows in the larger Nigerian society and indeed in Africa as a whole. Much of the story revolves around Yaremi, the novel’s protagonist.

Plot
The novel opens with Yaremi recalling the events leading to the death of her husband, Ajumobi and her predicament thereafter. While mourning Ajumobi’s death, Yaremi suffered great humiliation from extended family who strongly believed that she was responsible for her husband’s death. She became very lonely, not only as a result of Ajumobi’s death, but also because her two daughters, Segi and Wura, who would have kept her company, had been married off. Her only son, Alani who lived in the city had become so urbanised that he hardly visited Kufi. Yaremi had to fend for herself and take up manly roles. For instance, she had to farm all by herself and clear the bushes around her home in addition to her main job of selling taffeta products.

Yaremi was a very strong and hardworking woman. She got little help and some company from Woye, her grandson who lived with her. Yaremi enjoyed recounting her interesting childhood experiences to Woye in the form of stories while working on taffeta clothes. Through these stories, Woye learnt how to count numbers and also learnt the importance of hardwork and resilience.

Besides Yaremi, there were three other widows in Kufi who had gone through similar ordeals. They often empathised and shared their widowhood experiences with one another whenever they met on the narrow road leading to the village river. One of them was Dedewe who was tortured and humiliated by her husband’s relatives. Dedewe was made to sit alone by her husband’s corpse in a dark room and also compelled to own up to offences she never committed. Another widow, Fayoyin suffered similar fate. Her hair was badly shaved and she was forced to lick libation. The third widow, Radeke was also accused of killing her husband. These accusations stem from the people’s superstitious belief that no death was natural; hence, a husband’s death must have been caused by his wife.

Through Yaremi’s reminiscences, the author introduces his readers to Ajumobi. Ajumobi was a brave and powerful hunter who enjoyed boasting of his prowess as a successful hunter. In his lifetime, he was firm and had absolute control of his household. Ajumobi was a happy and lively man. Like most men in Kufi, he liked drinking palmwine in the company of friends. He was quite ambitious. Prior to his death, he planned to renovate his house and even take a second wife. Yaremi loved her husband greatly and in spite of their many squabbles in his lifetime, she missed his affection and companionship.

Yaremi was economically self-reliant and assertive. Most men in Kufi resented her as they expected their women to always play second fiddle or be in a subordinate position to them. Like other widows in Kufi, Yaremi was expected to remarry by all means. Radeke, Fayoyin and Dedewe had gone through the cap picking ceremony where they chose new men to replace their deceased husbands.
Yaremi resisted all pressure and chose to remain unmarried. She demonstrated her resolve by turning down proposals from three suitors and refusing to pick up a cap at the cap picking ceremony organised to facilitate her remarriage. As a result, the village elders threatened to confiscate her husband’s property and banish her from the village. The story ends with Yaremi taking off her widowhood garment and expressing a renewed determination to remain in Kufi in spite of all odds.

Themes
i.)  Widowhood or The plight of widows:

The theme of widowhood is the novel’s central theme. The widows in Lonely Days were subjected to pain and humiliation. The widowhood experiences of Yaremi, Dedewe, Fayoyin and Radeke are a miscrosm of the plight of widows in the larger Nigerian society and in the African continent as a whole. The author condemns widow inheritance, forced remarriage and other cultural practices that subject widows to pain and humiliation.

ii.) Loneliness:

Another important theme that runs through the novel is the theme of loneliness. Yaremi was very lonely and had to do most things by herself. For instance, she had to appeal to Uncle Deyo, Ajumobi’s friend to assist in mending her leaking roof and rebuilding the walls of her house.

iii.) Humiliation:

Yaremi suffered humiliation from extended relations who accused her of killing her husband. Dedewe, Fayoyin and Radeke also suffered humiliation. For instance, Dedewe was made to sit in a dark room by her husband’s corpse while Fayoyin’s hair was badly shaved.  Hardwork or Diligence: The theme of diligence is expressed by Yaremi’s industrious character. The author uses several anecdotes to encourage hardwork.

iv) Male chauvinism:

This is a belief or notion usually held by men that women are inferior to them. Yaremi suffered resentment from most men in Kufi because of her self-reliant and assertive status.

v.) Survival, Resilience and Determination:

Yaremi had the will and the determination to survive in spite of her predicament as a widow. She worked very hard to earn a decent living and refused to be cowed into accepting traditional injunctions of widow inheritance and remarriage set by her society.

vi.) Superstitions:

The novel explains how superstitious beliefs impact on people’s behaviour. For instance, wives were accused of killing their husbands because of the belief that someone had to be responsible for every death. They also suspected feathered creatures like birds as they were usually linked to witchcraft.

vii.) Death:

In Kufi, the people believed that there were good and bad deaths. Yaremi consoled herself with the notion that Ajumobi died a good death. It was also believed that the dead people watch over the living. This explains Yaremi’s many monologues addressed to her late husband, Ajumobi.

Other books by the author(Lonely Days by Bayo Adebowale) are: Out Of His Mind and The Ambitious Village Boy.


SETTING:

The novel’s location is Kufi, an imaginary village in the South-Western part of Nigeria. The author uses Kufi to represent and illustrate the larger society’s treatment of widows.

NARRATIVE TECHNIQUES: lonely days by bayo adebowale

The author uses mainly the third person narrative. However, on few occasions the author let Yaremi tell her own story.

CHARACTERS

The characters in this novel are grouped into major and minor characters.



Major characters in lonely days by bayo adebowale



1. Yaremi

She is the protagonist of the novel. Yaremi is a brave, confident, generous, self empowered and an industrious woman. She is the mother of Segi, Wura and Alani. The death of her husband made her a victim of marginalization, deprivation and victimization.



2. Ajumobi

He was a brave hunter. Ajumobi was Yaremi's late husband and the father of Segi, Wura and Alani. He was "well to do" in his lifetime. He owned a cocoa farm, trees, banana, kolanut trees and fruiting palm trees. Ajumobi was a loving husband who stuttered when he was angry.



3. Woye

The son of Segi and grandson of Yaremi. He is a hardworking child and worthy companion of Yaremi. He helps Yaremi in her taffeta business and likes listening to her stories. He is a healthy child who likes playing football. Woye insists on going to school so that he can read the letters of the alphabet like his mates.



Minor characters in lonely days by bayo adebowale



1. Segi

Yaremi's first daughter and confidant. She is the mother of Woye and the wife of Wande. She lives in Alode with her husband.



2. Alani

He is the only son of Yaremi and late Ajumobi. He lives in Ibadan where he has a booming carpentry business.



3. Uncle Deyo

He was Ajumobi's bossom friend when Ajumobi was alive. He is a responsible friend and takes his friend's family as his even after his friend's demise. He helps Yaremi with difficult chores like mending of the leaking roof of her house and rebuilding the walls of her mud house.



4. Fayoyin, Dedewe and Radeke

These are the three widows who are also marginalized and victimized like Yaremi by the customs and tradition of Kufi land.



5. Rogba

He is the village flute player. He displays his talent during the cap-picking ceremony.



6. Ayanwale

He is one of Yaremi's suitors. He tries to impress her with stories of his earthly achievement so she can pick him during the cap-picking ceremony. He is also a drummer.



7. Lanwa

Lanwa is one of Yaremi's suitors and a wealthy man (farmer) who claims kinship with Yaremi's late husband.



8. Olonade

He is one of Yaremi's suitors. He brags of making Yaremi a mother of twins once she accepts him in the cap-picking ceremony. He is also a wood carver.



9. Sokoti

He is commonly known as "Iron man". He is a husband to Wura. He is a blacksmith and does his work in Apon where he lives.



10. Wura

She is the second daughter and child of Yaremi and late Ajumobi. She lives with her husband, Sokoti, in Apon.

3) CHAPTER SUMMARY: lonely days by bayo adebowale

Chapter 1

Yaremi mourned the death of Ajumobi and tried to console herself with the fact that Ajumobi did not die a shameful death.
The mourners falsely suspected her of having killed her husband.
She became very lonely with no husband or children to keep her company.
Woye, her grandson became her only company. She told him stories of her childhood and taught him number games while making taffeta.


Chapter 2

Chapter 2 captures Yaremi’s everyday routine especially how she worked hard in the kitchen, in the forest while gathering firewood and in the dyeing yard where she produced her taffeta.
Yaremi is portrayed as a very strong, beautiful and agile woman in spite of her age.


Chapter 3

This chapter describes the narrow road leading to the village river. This road served as a meeting point for widows in Kufi.
The chapter also features stories of humiliation, torture and ill-treatment of other widows in Kufi namely Dedewe, Fayoyin and Radeke.


Chapter 4

Yaremi showed her versatility by combining different tasks. She made stitches, discarded husks of palm kernel and blew chaff off the melon seeds.
She spent her leisure time exchanging pleasantries with neighbours and telling Woye stories from her childhood days.
The importance of time management was emphasised in this chapter.
Chapter 5

Woye is portrayed as a very playful child. Yaremi taught Woye how to make scarecrow to ward off hawks.
The chapter reveals the people’s superstitious beliefs.
Chapter 5 describes events leading to the death of Ajumobi.


Chapter 6

Yaremi is portrayed as an independent woman who was no longer under the control of a man.
This chapter introduces the readers to the character of Ajumobi. Ajumobi is described as a brave and powerful hunter. He was also very ambitious.
Yaremi recalled the moments they spent together and showed how much she adored him.
Ajumobi expressed his desire for a polygamous marriage.


Chapter 7

The author describes moonlight night in Kufi.
Yaremi recalled her relationship with Ajumobi in his lifetime.
She recalled how she insulted him on some occasions and how Ajumobi beat her.
After his death, Ajumobi appeared on different occasions.
Yaremi attempted to ask Ajumobi several rhetorical questions.
Yaremi expressed her desire for Ajumobi’s affection.
Chapter 8

This chapter describes how Yaremi sold her taffeta in different markets and how she dealt with her debtors.
Woye’s ill-health worried Yaremi. She gave him special attention and made several promises. These were aimed at making him recover quickly.
Woye recovered from his illness.
Chapter 9

This chapter describes Kufi women. They were hardworking and showed so much devotion to their husbands and children. It also describes how women coped in polygamous homes.
Yaremi displayed her generousity by sharing her food with others.
Yaremi became influential and assertive. Most men in Kufi resented her for these attributes.
Ayanwale, Olonade and Lanwa proposed marriage to Yaremi.
Chapter 10

Yaremi displayed manly attributes.
She chided her suitors and turned down their marriage proposals.
Ajumobi appeared to Yaremi in her dreams assuring her of his presence and support.
Her extended family planned to organise a cap picking ceremony to facilitate her remarriage and a purification ritual to make her forget the past.
Chapter 11

Dedeke, Fayoyin and Radeke tried to talk Yaremi into remarriage.
This chapter features the cap picking ceremony.
Yaremi refused to pick a cap at the cap picking ceremony.
The villagers were angry.
Chapter 12

Yaremi suffered great resentment from the villagers as a result of her decision to remain unmarried.
She recalled her happy days with Ajumobi especially how he showered her with love, care and affection.
She considered leaving Kufi for Adeyipo, her parents’ village.
Chapter 13

Segi visited Adeyipo village. Yaremi confided in Segi and expressed her fears.
The chapter features many unanswered questions associated with a widow’s second marriage.
Woye looked forward to starting school in Olode.
Woye returned to Olode with Segi, his mother.
Chapter 14

Alani, Yareni’s son arrived from the city.
Uncle Deyo scolded him for keeping away from the village and from his father’s properties.
Uncle Deyo took Alani to Ajumobi’s cocoa plantation showing him the farm’s boundaries.
To Yaremi’s chagrin, Alani announced that he was returning to the city and was not interested in cultivating his late father’s farm.
The village elders threatened to confiscate Ajumobi’s properties and banish Yaremi completely from the village.
Yaremi resolved to remain in Kufi in spite of all odds.

 ALSO READ:
Character analysis and roles of all character in Harvest of corruption
Analysis of the theme of Native son by Richard Wright
Roles and analysis of bigger thomas in the native son
4) USE OF FIGURATIVE EXPRESSIONS: lonely days by bayo adebowale

The author’s generous use of figurative expressions is evident throughout the novel.

1. Metaphor

This is a figure of speech that equates two things that are not the same. Comparison is done without the use of “as” or “like”. In Lonely Days, the number game, for instance, has a lot of metaphors in it. Page 8 paragraph 3 reads: “Three is the dirty calabash on my mother’s wooden rack…”. See also paragraphs 4, 6, 7, and 8. You may also see paragraphs 1 to 6 of page 10. Another use of metaphoric expression is seen on page 9 paragraph 3 when Yaremi said “Work was music to us, Woye.” See also the last paragraph of Page 15 where the author directly compares life with fire by saying “Life is fire”. The slippery and narrow river road in Chapter 3 is equally metaphoric. It is directly described as the “Widows’ Road” on which widows thread with caution. The author’s description of a new wife on page 58 also contains a number of metaphors-“A new wife is a polished drum…”; she is a fresh lily…”

2. Simile

This is a figure of speech that compares two non-similar things by the use of “as” or “like”. The author uses simile to describe Yaremi’s loneliness- “Yaremi felt thoroughly abandoned, like a stone at the bottom of a lake” (page 3); “… the extended family’s mockery heaped on her like the strange showers of a January rain” (page 3). Uncle Deyo used simile in describing Alani’s long stay in the city- “You flew away, Alani, like a bird with no destination; like a stone-missile flung aimlessly to an unknown destination from the leather-strap of a catapult”. (page 135)

3. Personification

This is a figure of speech in which human attributes are given to inanimate objects. An example is seen on page 60 paragraph 1- “the moon peeped and vanished, to reappear playfully again among the woods, seducing onlookers’ souls with serene beauty…” 4. Hyperbole: An exaggerated statement not meant to be taken literally. It’s used for emphasis and comic effect. Ajumobi’s boastings in page 50 contain a lot of hyperbole.

5. Rhetorical Questions:

These are questions that do not require answers. Yaremi asked lots of rhetorical questions on page 69- “where are you now, Ajumobi?” is an example of a rhetorical question. Segi also asked rhetorical questions on pages 126 and 127 where she raised questions on remarriage.


5) IMPORTANT LITERARY DEVICES

Exposition:

Exposition is a literary device used to introduce background information about the characters, setting and events to the reader. In Lonely Days, the author explains the character of Ajumobi, the marital life of Ajumobi and Yaremi, and events leading up to the death of Ajumobi through Exposition. This exposition is presented through Yaremi’s thoughts, dialogues between Yaremi and Ajumobi as well as monologues.

Falling Action

The falling action in a work of literature is the sequence of events that follow the climax and end in the resolution. In Lonely Days the falling action occurs after Yaremi refused to pick a cap at the cap-picking ceremony: She suffered great resentment from the villagers because of her decision not to remarry. They also threatened to banish her from the village and confiscate her husband’s properties.

Rising Action

Rising action is what happens in a story leading up to the most exciting part of the story. In Lonely Days, the rising action occurs where Yaremi’s extended family planned to organise a cap picking ceremony to facilitate her remarriage and her co-widows (Fayoyin, Radeke and Dedewe) tried to persuade her to choose a husband at the cap-picking ceremony.

Climax

is the part of the story where the tension or action reaches its highest point. In Lonely Days, the climax occurs at the cap-picking ceremony when Yaremi refused to choose a suitor by picking a cap.

Resolution

Resolution is the part of the story’s plot line in which the problem of the story is resolved or worked out. It comes after the falling action and it is typically where the story ends. In Lonely Days, the resolution occurs when Yaremi resolved to remain in Kufi in spite of the village elders’ threat to confiscate her husband’s properties and banish her from the village.
6) LIKELY QUESTIONS

1. Attempt a chapter summary of Lonely Days.

2. Discuss the character and role of Yaremi in Lonely Days.

3. Discuss the following: i. Five stages of plot ii. the setting iii. the relationship between Yaremi and Ajumobi

4. Discuss the components of oral tradition in Lonely Days

5. Identify and discuss four themes in Lonely Days.

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Friday, 16 February 2018

Faceless by Amma Darko

Faceless by Amma Darko

faceless by amma darko

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Amma Darko was born in Koforidua, Ghana, and grew up in Accra. She studied in Kumasi, where she received her diploma in 1980. She is one of the most significant contemporary Ghanaian literary writers. She is the author of the following novels:  Faceless (2003), The Housemaid (1999), Beyond the Horizon (1995) and Not Without Flowers (2007). Analysis of “Faceless”

PLOT

Attempted Rape

The novel opens with fourteen year old Fofo sleeping on an old cardboard at the Agbogbloshie market. Except for her new job of washing carrots at the vegetable market in Agbogbloshie, her life in Sodom and Gomorrah, a slum close to the market consisted mainly of watching adult movies and taking alcohol. In her sleep, she dreamt of living in a home with a roof and a toilet, a dream shared by other street children  like her.

She was woken up suddenly by Poison, a street lord who attempted to rape her. Fofo resisted him and ran to Odarley, her best friend who lived in a rented wooden shack. She told Odarley about Poison’s attempted rape and her intention to see her mother whom she believed had some connections with Poison. Fofo’s mother, Maa Tsuru informed Fofo, that her elder sister, Baby T was dead and Poison had threatened her into silence over Baby T’s death. She therefore urged Fofo to leave for her safety.

Kabria’s Encounter with Fofo

In sharp contrast to the life in Sodom and Gomorrah is Kabria’s life with her family. A mother of three lively children- Obea, Essie and Ottu, she lived in a decent neighbourhood in Accra, worked with MUTE a non-governmental agency and drove a problematic old car nick-named Creamy. She ran into Fofo at the Agbloghoshie market while shopping for vegetables. Kabria was standing with other spectators at the spot where Baby T’s body was found when Fofo, disguising as a boy tried to steal her purse. Kabria rescued her from the angry mob. Fofo revealed her female identity and told Kabria that Baby T was her sister. Meanwhile, a lot of people had been made to believe that the dead girl (Baby T) was a kayayoo(a market porter from the north) to conceal her true identity and discourage further enquiry into her death. MUTE (the non-governmental organisation where Kabria worked) got interested in Baby T’s matter and granted Fofo protection by taking her into custody temporarily while conducting investigations into the circumstances surrounding Baby T’s death.

The circumstances surrounding Baby T’s death was revealed through two main sources: Fofo and investigations by MUTE.

How Baby T became a prostitute

Baby T was the third child of Maa Tsuru while Fofo was fourth. Their jobless father, Kwei had abandoned them mainly as a result of the superstitious belief that Maa Tsuru had been cursed from birth. Baby T was sexually abused by her mother’s second lover, Kpakpo and was further defiled by Onko, a generous uncle who lived in the same compound with them and in whom she tried to confide.

Through Kpapkpo’s gimmicks, Baby T was sold to a prostitution ring  consisting of Madam Abidjan, Maami Brooni and Poison, the street lord and ring leader. She was made to work as a child prostitute in Maami Brooni’s brothel with her earnings sent to Maa Tsuru who simply turned a blind eye.

Meanwhile, Onko’s welding business had suffered great setback after defiling Baby T. A witchdoctor made him believe that his misfortune was caused by the defilement of Baby T whom he said was a cursed child. As a form of remedy, the witch doctor asked Onko to bring some sacrificial items which would include Baby T’s pubic hair.

How Baby T died

Kpakpo helped Onko to connect with Baby T once again. Poison eventually led Kpakpo to Maami Brooni’s brothel where Baby T worked as a prostitute. Baby T remembered what Onko did to her in the past and totally declined to sleep with him. Enraged at her refusal, Poison slapped and tried to beat her into submission. Baby T was found dead on the concrete floor with her head split open. She was alone with Onko in the room at the time of her death. Onko committed suicide thereafter.

THEMES OF FACELESS by Amma darko

Discrimination against women: Baby T and Maa Tsuru are symbolically representative of the sins visited upon all women in a society where from birth women are discriminated against and made responsible not only for their sins, but for those of men in society. In the story, nothing goes right when men are involved and many of the male characters in the novel are murderers, child abusers, rapists, or simply good for nothing. Those not presented in this light are trapped in their distorted perceptions of women as caregivers and housewives, such as Kabrias husband, Adade, who expects her to be waiting at the door to take his briefcase when he returns from work. Despite the fact that Kabria works a long day, she is still expected to manage the household, cook, and take care of the children.
Maa Tsuru who is abandoned penniless by her husband as a result of a curse (being fertile) is a victim of dehumanisation. Her unfortunate predicament is made worse by superstition, poverty and illiteracy. Her daughter, Baby T is raped by Kpakpo and later murdered by Poison.
Darko, cleverly, depicts these evils perpetrated against women in our society. She urges us, especially men, to search their conscience and have a change of mind in the way they see the role of women in the family and in the society at large.

Street child phenomenon: The novel, faceless by amma darko, demonstrates the personal and social tragedy of each and every child that ends up on the streets. As one of the characters puts it in quoting assassinated US president John F. Kennedy, The future promise of any nation can be directly measured by the present prospects of its youth.
Baby T and her siblings end up on the streets as a result of their parents irresponsility. This parental failure exposes them to the streets where the fittest survive. They become prostitutes, petty robbers and heavy drinkers to survive on the street. Later, Baby T is murdered by Poison, the street lord. Amma Darko seems to be asking what hope there is if societies can allow the conditions that result in the fate of Baby T, Fofo and other street children in Ghana and other African countries. Children who are victims of abuse grow up to become abusers themselves, as is the case of poison who is shown to be a victim through his own abuse as a child, but who now no longer suffered the pain, he inflicted it.
Darko succeeds in hammering home a powerful message that children and the way they are treated are the true measures of how societies are judged.

Leadership failure: Proverbs 29:2 states, When the righteous are in authority, the people rejoice; but when the wicked beareth rule, the people mourn. In Faceless by amma darko, it is evident that there is total neglect of duty, either by omission or commission, on the part of government of the day. There is a total neglect of social institutions that see to the day to day running of the society. The police station that Kabria visited with her colleague was in a state of dilapidation. There was no vehicle, no good filing system and the building itself is about to collapse. The police are charged with the sole responsibility of maintaining law and order, but an ill-equipped police will surely come short of this responsibility. Anarchy rules when there is a breakdown in law and order. This is the reason why people like Poison will continue to reign and cause havoc in the society.

The role of the media and NGOs in championing social courses: In faceless by amma darko, the role of the media and non-governmental organisations in the propagation and sustenance of peace and crime free society is highly underscored. The role of these agencies is critical. They shoulder a huge responsibility that should be jealously guarded for the good of the society. The people rely on the media for information, and a well-informed society is a progressive society. In the novel, Sylv Po of Harvest FM represents the picture of the work of the media. Sylv Po is both active and intelligent. He develops interest in Fofos case and uses his radio programme to fight against crime in the society.
Kabria, on her own part with her organization, did a wonderful job. MUTE is a veritable NGO with the special task of information documentation on social problems such as demented pregnant women, street child issue, etc. MUTE picks interest in Fofos case and together with Sylv Po of Harvest FM, the mystery behind the death of Baby T is unraveled.
Darko seems to be saying that the responsibility of maintaining a peaceful environment should not be left to the government alone. The media, NGOs, private institutions, and individuals all have a role to play in the maintenance of order and crime free society.

SETTING OF Faceless by Amma Darko

The story of Faceless is set in one of the most hostile parts of Accra, called Sodom and Gomorrah, named after the biblical city that God destroyed because of its numerous sins. Although the author uses unreal names, she narrates what can possibly be described as real-life events at venues that really exist. Agbogbloshie, Makola market, Abossey-Okai Abeka, korle-Bu and the all-notorious Sodom and Gomorrah can really be found in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana.

PLOT-SETTING-SUMMARY 2 : Faceless by amma darko

Sometimes it is better to tell the story of a street child than to look for his murderer. We learn this definitively from Henning Mankell’s book. Amma Darko tells the opposite story: searching for the murderer makes for a better life for those who survive in the streets.

14-year-old Fofo is a street child living in a part of Accra named “Sodom and Gomorrha,” a place that is not good for anybody, least of all to children. Fofo has made it her task to find out what happened to her sister, Baby T, who was found dumped behind a marketplace, beaten and mutilated. Baby T. was the third child of Ma Tsumu, and was born after a brutal beating intended to abort the baby. Her father disappeared, leaving Ma Tsumu to fend for herself with four children. Soon Ma Tsumu found a new lover to share her bed, Kpakpo, who is good-for-nothing and earns his keep by “dubious” means.

Not willing to accept the presence of the new lover, the two brothers leave home. Soon after, Baby T. is sexually abused by Kpakpo. Hurt and confused, the twelve year old girl doesn’t confide in her mother, but instead in a family friend, Onko, who in turn rapes her. Ma Tsumu who then learns about the tragedy finds herself unable to do anything but take money from Onko, who continues to live in the same compound as Baby T. The situation is untenable. Kpakpo suggests that Baby T be sold into prostitution. The theme of discrimination against women is always present in this story. Baby T is representative of the sins visited upon all women in a society where they are discriminated against from birth. There is a note of home in the landscape of the story, when Baby T’s sister Fofo meets with a group of women who run an institution that documents issues called MUTE. The four women are inspired by the plight of Fofo and convert their library center into a practical street initiative.

Author Amma Darko has lived in Accra, near the marketplace where the crime happened. She evokes the vicious cycles of poverty and violence that drive children to the streets and women to prostitution. Her powerful message says that the way children are treated is the true measure of how societies are judged. When life is viewed through children’s eyes, it becomes clear that societies must find the answers to the moral predicaments that they finds themselves in.

LITERARY DEVICES: Faceless by amma darko

Style/Language: The novel is divided in into three unequal partsbook one being the biggest. The story is narrated with the eye of God point of view. This is why the pronouns such as: he, she, they, it, his, her, etc., are predominant. The story is quite conversational as characters can be seen in face to face interactions.
The writing Faceless by amma darko is brilliant with simple, easy to understand Ghanaian English, interspersed with the vernacular, giving the reader a feel of Ghanaian culture and what makes her tick. The narrative style is straightforward, drawing the audience in, building tension as the author takes us through dizzying moment of intrigue and suspense to reveal the hidden truth behind the murder of Baby T.

Monologue: This is a long speech made by a character in a story especially when he or she is alone. This device is amply used by Amma Darko to portray the frustrations of Kabria caused by Creamy, the 1975 VW Beetle handed down to her by her husband, Adade. Creamy is an old, rickety car that has seen all kinds of weathers and need to be changed. It frustrates and embarrasses Kabria that she is seen on several occasions talking to it. One time, the car stops in a traffic and Kabria begs it not to disappoint her.

Flashback: This is a device used to recall past events during current events to help us understand the present. We get to know about Maa Tsurus past through a flashback provided by Naa Yomo. We equally get to know Poisons past through flashback. With this we understand what makes Maa Tsuru and Poison behave the way they do. We even sympathise with them, knowing that they are victims of circumstances.

Anticlimax: This is the arrangement of the events of a story so that they appear in descending order. The story of Faceless by amma darko begins with the death of Baby T followed by the gradual unfolding of other events that cause her death. So the story starts from where it should end.

CHARACTERISATION/ROLES : Faceless by amma darko

Baby T: Baby T is the third child of Maa Tsuru. She is sexually abused by her mothers live-in lover, Kpakpo. Confused and betrayed, she confides in a family friend and co-tenant, Onko, who takes advantage of her trust and rapes her. At the advice of Kpakpo Baby T is sent out to Maami Broni through Mama Abidjan to become a comfort woman. She is murdered by poison when she refuses to sleep with Onko who is plotting to get a strand of her pubic hair for the cleansing of his contaminated blood. Baby Ts body is dumped behind a blue Rasta Hairdressing kiosk Salon. The discovery of her dead body triggers Fofo to seek justice for her.

Maa Tsuru: Maa Tsurus mother is betrayed by the young man who impregnated her. She rained curses on him and all his descendants as life drains out of her in giving birth to the baby who will later be known as Maa Tsuru. Maa Tsuru grows up labeled as a cursed person. People distance themselves from her in her family house, where she also resides. After having two sons and two daughters with Kwei, he abandons them. Her two sons leave as soon as they are able to fend for themselves, thereby escaping the nightly moans coming from Maa Tsuru and her new live-in lover.
A new man worms his way into Maa Tsurus bed and connives with Mama Abidjan who promises to find work for Baby T through her questionable recruitment agency in exchange for periodic payments to feed Maa Tsurus new family. Maa Tsuru gives birth to two more children, bringing the number of her children to six and forcing Fofo to leave home. Maa Tsurus life is full of sorrows and regrets; she represents a typical African woman who is made miserable by the men she allowed into her life.

Kabria: Kabria is the backbone of her family. She multitasks as a mother, wife and social worker. Kabrias husband, Adade, an architect, contents himself with his work, joining co-workers to drinking spots to release tension and returning home for dinner. Kabrias children; Obea, Essie and Ottu are all in school. Each childs character is a force to reckon with, but Kabria takes care of their needs almost single-handedly. Kabria plays a crucial role in the unravelling of the mystery behind the murder of Baby T. She takes an interest in Fofos case and manages to get her organization, MUTE, to delve into it. Kabria is Fofos foil character as her family life presents a sharp contrast to Fofos and her street companions.

Fofo: Fofo is the fourth child of Maa Tsuru. She leaves home when she can no longer put up with her mothers excesses. She sets out to find justice for her sisters murder when she gets to know that Baby Ts mutilated body has been found at Agbogbloshie. In a twist of fate, she runs into Kabria who works with a non-governmental organisation named MUTE which functions as an interventionist and alternative library for every social, gender and child issues. MUTE takes an interest in Fofos case and determines to find out what led to Baby Ts death. With the help of Sylv Po, the reporter from Harvest FM, they work their way into a syndicate led by Poison, the street lord that trades in child prostitution, drugs and all manner of street crimes.

Poison: Poison was an innocent boy who ran away from home to escape the constant abuse of a drunken stepfather. He got himself caught up in a bad company. He ended up as a messenger in a brothel while working his way up by bullying, raping and murdering and is now known as Poison, the street lord―a clear case of a victim turned into a victimiser. He is the one that killed Baby T and ordered for her body to be dumped behind the Rasta Hairdressing Kiosk Salon at Agbogbloshie.

Kwei: Kwei is an unemployed mason who still lives with his mother when he should be on his own fending for himself. His relationship with Maa Tsuru is not accepted by his mother as she sees her as a cursed woman. Kwei does not listen to his mother; rather, he gets Maa Tsuru pregnant. He leaves for a greener pasture, leaving promises of a better life when he returns, and so is not around when his first child is born. However, he comes back with tales of woe and disappointment. He gets Maa Tsuru pregnant the second time and abandons her. He comes back after the birth of his second boy empty-handed, but looking like a changed man. Somehow, he manages to warm himself back into the arms of Maa Tsuru. He impregnates her yet again, but this time he becomes fed up with Maa Tsurus fecundity. He gives her the beating of her life with the sole purpose of aborting the baby, but fails. The baby is named Baby T even in the absence of her father. Kwei comes back the third time, lures Maa Tsuru into his arms, gets her pregnant and disappears for good, leaving Maa Tsuru with four children to cater for. Kwei represents the theme of parental irresponsibility.

Kpakpo: Kpakpo is another character that exemplifies the theme of parental irresponsibility. He is small in stature, but full of fraud and deceit. He makes a living by tricking people; he copllects rents from them without providing accommodation. Because of this, he is always trying to hide from his creditors.
Kpakpo takes advantage of Maa Tsuru promising her love and warming his way into her bed, and bearing two sons with her. He becomes a leech on Maa Tsuru, sucking her and her children dry. He is the first to molest Baby T one night when Maa Tsuru is away as a result of pregnancy complication. He is the one that suggested sending Baby T away to Maami Broni to cover up the shameful thing he did to Baby T. Kpakpo later abandoned Maa Tsuru with their two sons.

Onko: Onko lives in the same compound with Maa Tsuru, Naa Yomo and other tenants. Everyone in the compound sees Onko as a kind man, especially the children who usually cluster around him. After Baby T is molested by the live-in lover of her mother, she confides in Onko, but he takes advantage of her and rapes her. However, Onko continues to eye Baby T. This new situation is too much for Maa Tsuru to take, so she decides to take the advice of Kpakpo to send Baby T away.
After the raping of Baby T, Onkos furniture business begins to crumble. His customers begin to leave him until his business finally collapses. He seeks help from a native doctor and amongst the things he is asked to bring is a strand of Baby Ts pubic hair. He finds his way to Maami Broni through Kpakpo and pays Poison a huge sum of money to sleep with Baby T. Rmembering how Onko destroyed her life, Baby T refuses to sleep with him. It is while Poison is beating Baby T into submission that he murdered her. Onko commits suicide afterwards.
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Sunday, 28 January 2018

Use Of Allusion - harvest of corruption

Use of allusion in harvest of corruption


There are few cases of allusion in the play. An allusion is an explicit or indirect reference to what has happened elsewhere, either in history, the Bible, myths and legends, the gods, etc for purposes of association or comparison. On page 14 of the play, Chief surrenders to Madam Hoha's request to cater for her welfare with "I am not ready for another Biafran war this evening ooo!" This is a reference to the Nigeria-Biafra Civil War of 1967-70. After Aloho has become pregnant and is advised by Ogeyi to go back to the village to consult with her mother, she refers to herself as "prodigal daughter" (p. 87). It is a reference to the Bible, the story of the "prodigal son" who lavishes his father's welfare and goodwill before deciding to go back to the house. Another reference to the Bible is the Judge's assertion that "the wages of sin is death" (p. 114) though he says he is not sure if the death "is a physical or spiritual one" (p. 114). Similarly, echoing Christ in the Bible, the Judge refers to people like Chief as those "who dress in sheep clothing when actually they are wolves" (p. 117).

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Wednesday, 27 April 2016

Raisinn in the sun

Analysis of Raisin in the Sun.

Plot Account
A Raisin in the Sun portrays a few weeks in the life of the Youngers, an African-American family living on the Side of Chicago in the 1950s. When the play opens, the Youngers are about to receive an insurance check for $10,000. This money comes from the deceased Mr. Younger’s life insurance policy. Each of the adult members of the family has an idea as to what he or she would like to do with this money. The matriarch of the family, Mama, wants to buy a house to fulfill a dream she shared with her husband. Mama’s son, Walter Lee, would rather use the money to invest in a liquor store with his friends. He believes that the investment will solve the family’s financial problems forever. Walter’s wife, Ruth, agrees with Mama, however, and hopes that she and Walter can provide more space and opportunity for their son, Travis. Finally, Beneatha, Walter’s sister and Mama’s daughter, wants to use the money for her medical school tuition. She also wishes that
her family members were not so interested in joining the white world. Beneatha instead tries to find her identity by looking back to the past and to Africa. As the play progresses, the Youngers clash over their competing dreams. Ruth discovers that she is pregnant but fears that if she has the child, she will put more financial pressure on her family members. When Walter says nothing to Ruth’s admission that she is considering abortion, Mama puts a down payment on a house for the whole family. She believes that a bigger, brighter dwelling will help them all. This house is in Clybourne Park, an entirely white neighborhood. When the Youngers’ future neighbors find out that the Youngers are moving in, they send Mr. Lindner, from the Clybourne Park Improvement Association, to offer the Youngers money in return for staying away. The Youngers refuse the deal, even after Walter loses the rest of the money ($6,500) to his friend Willy Harris, who persuades Walter to invest in the liquor store and then runs off with his cash. In the meantime, Beneatha rejects her suitor, George Murchison, whom she believes to be shallow and blind to the problems of race. Subsequently, she receives a marriage proposal from her Nigerian boyfriend, Joseph Asagai, who wants Beneatha to get a medical degree and move to Africa with him (Beneatha does not make her choice before the end of the play). The Youngers eventually move out of the apartment, fulfilling the family’s long-held dream. Their future seems uncertain and slightly dangerous, but they are optimistic and determined to live a better life. They believe that they can succeed if they stick together as a family and resolve to defer their dreams no
longer.


Analysis of Major Characters

Walter As Mama’s only son, Ruth’s defiant husband, Travis’s caring father, and Beneatha’s belligerent brother, Walter serves as both protagonist and antagonist of the play. The plot revolves around him and the actions that he takes, and his character evolves the most during the course of the play. Most of his actions and mistakes hurt the family greatly, but his belated rise to manhood makes him a sort of hero in the last scene.


Mama
Mama is Walter and Beneatha’s sensitive mother and the head of the Younger household. She demands that members of her family respect themselves and take pride in their dreams. Mama requires that the apartment in which they live always be neat and polished. She stands up for her beliefs and provides perspective from an older generation. She believes in striving to succeed while maintaining her moral boundaries; she rejects Beneatha’s progressive and seemingly un-Christian sentiments about God, and Ruth’s consideration of an abortion disappoints her. Similarly, when Walter comes to her with his idea to invest in the liquor store venture, she condemns the idea and explains that she will not participate in such un-Christian business. Money is only a means to an end for Mama; dreams are more important to her than material wealth, and her dream is to own a house with a garden and yard in which Travis can play.

Beneatha
Beneatha is an attractive college student who provides a young, independent, feminist perspective, and her desire to become a doctor demonstrates her great ambition. Throughout the play, she searches for her identity. She dates two very different men: Joseph Asagai and George Murchison. She is at her happiest with Asagai, her Nigerian boyfriend, who has nicknamed her “Alaiyo,” which means “One for Whom Bread—Food—Is Not Enough.” She is at her most depressed and angry with George, her pompous, affluent African-American boyfriend. She identifies much more with Asagai’s interest in rediscovering his African roots than with George’s interest in assimilating into white culture.


Asagai
One of Beneatha’s fellow students and one of her suitors, Asagai is from Nigeria, and throughout the play he provides an international perspective. Proud of his African heritage, he hopes to return to Nigeria to help bring about positive change and modern advancements. He tries to teach Beneatha about her heritage as well. He stands in obvious contrast to Beneatha’s other suitor, George Murchison,


List of all character and their roles

Walter Lee Younger -
The protagonist of the play. Walter is a dreamer. He wants to be rich and devisesplans to acquire wealth with his friends, particularly Willy Harris. When the play opens, he wants to invest his father’s insurance money in a new liquor store venture. He spends the rest of the play endlessly preoccupied with discovering a quick solution to his family’s various problems.

Beneatha Younger (“Bennie”) -
Mama’s daughter and Walter’s sister. Beneatha is an intellectual. Twenty years old, she attends college and is better educated than the rest of the Younger family. Some of her personal beliefs and views have distanced her from conservative Mama. She dreams of being a doctor and struggles to determine her identity as a well-educated black woman.

Lena Younger (“Mama”) -
Walter and Beneatha’s mother. The matriarch of the family, Mama is religious, moral, and maternal. She wants to use her husband’s insurance money as a down payment on a house with a backyard to fulfill her dream for her family to move up in the world.


Ruth Younger -
Walter’s wife and Travis’s mother. Ruth takes care of the Youngers’ small apartment. Her marriage to Walter has problems, but she
hopes to rekindle their love. She is about thirty, but her weariness makes her seem older Constantly fighting poverty and domestic troubles, she continues to be an emotionally strong woman. Her almost pessimistic pragmatism helpsher to survive.

Travis Younger -
Walter and Ruth’s sheltered young son. Travis earns some money by carrying grocery bags and likes to play outside with other neighborhood children, but he has no bedroom and sleeps on the living-room sofa.

Joseph Asagai -
A Nigerian student in love with Beneatha. Asagai, as he is often called, is very proud of his African heritage, and Beneatha hopes to learn about her African heritage from him. He eventually proposes marriage to Beneatha and hopes she will return to Nigeria with him.

George Murchison - A wealthy, African-American man who courts Beneatha. The Youngers approve of George, but Beneatha dislikes his willingness to submit to white culture and forget his African heritage. He challenges the thoughts and feelings of other black people through his arrogance and flair for intellectual competition.

Mr. Karl Lindner -
The only white character in the play. Mr. Lindner arrives at the Youngers’ apartment from the Clybourne Park Improvement Association. He offers the Youngers a deal to reconsider moving into his (all-white) neighborhood.

Bobo -
One of Walter’s partners in the liquor store plan. Bobo appears to be as mentally slow as his name indicates. Willy Harris - A friend of Walter and coordinator of the liquor store plan. Willy never appears onstage, which helps keep the focus of the story on the dynamics of the Younger family.

Mrs. Johnson -
The Youngers’ neighbor. Mrs. Johnson takes advantage of the Youngers’ hospitality and warns them about moving into a predominately white neighborhood.




Themes of A RAISIN IN THE SUN

1] SACRIFICE
2]SUFFERING
3]DISSATISFACTION
4] PORVERTY
5] PRIDE
6] POWER
7] RACIAL AFFIRMATION
8] RIGHT OF CHOICE
9] GENDER
10] DREAMS HOPE AND PLAN

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Friday, 19 February 2016

The themes of harvest of corruption


Analysis Of The Themes In Harvest Of Corruption


The theme of Retribution analysis

This is the central theme of the play. The main idea is that a man reaps what he sows. All the corrupt characters are brought to book in the end. Chief is convicted and sentenced to twenty-five years in imprisonment with hard labour and ordered to refund the embezzled funds. This punishment is his harvest of corruption. The humiliation suffered by Aloho for drug trafficking, her pregnancy and death also portray her harvest of corruption. Ochuole and Madam Hoha are sentenced to ten years in imprisonment with hard labour while Madam Hoha’s hotel is also sealed. This is their harvest of corruption. Justice Odili and the Commissioner of Police are sentenced to twenty years in imprisonment for receiving bribe. Ayo, the clerk is also punished as he is sentenced to five years
imprisonment for receiving a bribe.


The theme of Corruption analysis

The theme of Corruption
The author illustrates the bribery, large-scale embezzlement in official quarters, drug trafficking, sexual immorality perpetuated by highly placed personalities who are supposed to be policy makers and law enforcement officers. Frank Ogodo Ogbeche shows how corruption permeates government institutions and every fabric of the society as well as the devastating effect corruption has on our everyday life.


The theme of Betrayal of Public Trust analysis

The theme of Betrayal of Public Trust
Chief Haladu-Amaka, the Minister of External Relations betrayed the trust reposed in him by virtue of the public office he holds through large-scale embezzlement of public funds, forgery, fraud and bribery. The author advocates a political, social and moral re-birth.



The theme of Unemployment analysis

The theme of Unemployment: Unfortunately, many jobseekers have lost their dignity and souls to the devil just because of their desperate attempt to be gainfully employed. But can we blame them? How can it be justified that after rigorous school life, one spends two to three years still jobhunting? Of course this can be psychologically traumatizing! No wonder, jobless graduates are quick to succumb to societal pressure; they engage in any form of activities in the name of job insofar something comes out of it. Aloho and Ochuole are victims of this terrible situation in Jacassa. Consequently, one dies and the other is sentenced to jail. In Nigeria today, about 40 million people are unemployed and as found in Harvest of Corruption where Aloho becomes a drug trafficker and fornicator all in the name of being employed, many Nigerian youths are now gullible of several crimes and all other self-destructive acts. Needless to say, an idle hand is the devil’s workshop, as the popular saying goes.


The theme of impatient analysis

The theme of impatient
: Had Aloho listened to the voice of reason from her good and well-meaning friend Ogeyi Ogar, she would probably have been saved from the shame and her eventual destruction. When her best friend warns her against her working with Ochuole and Chief, Aloho pays deaf ears and replies: “You can call me a rebel, but I need a job. That’s what matters to me.” (page 9) Patience is indeed a virtue that Aloho lacks. He who has patience has everything but he who does not, has nothing. This is true of Aloho and it is the reason for her tragic end. Because of her stubbornness, she is made to peddle hard drugs unknowingly and is arrested. However, Chief, her boss, bails her out through corrupt means by bribing the judge though, Aloho’s shame and disgrace and frustration are heightened when she becomes pregnant for Chief. At last, she dies at childbirth. This is indeed a great lesson that trying to achieve any goal by all means, damning the consequences, always leads to a disastrous end for the person.  


The theme of Evil analysis

The theme of Evil :
Evil may last so long that people may wonder whether the perpetrator would ever bear the brunt of her action. In the play, the case of Chief Ade-Amaka is a clear indication of this assertion. He abuses public office by stealing with impunity while also engaging in cocaine pushing. Madam Hoha’s hotel is his haven for all the planning and scheming of the political bastardization. It is also, where he engages in sexual pervasion with Ochuole and then Aloho. He is doing this and having his way in such a manner that one might think he would never be caught. However, the law later catches up with him when Ogeyi Ogar, the Inspector Inaku and ACP Yakubu team up against him and the law of karma catches up on Chief
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Character analysis and roles of all character in Harvest of corruption


Roles and Analysis of Major and Minor Characters in Harvest of Corruption


Characterization of Harvest of Corruption

Character Analysis and Role of ALOHO In Harvest of Corruption

1. ALOHO
Aloho is the main character in the play. She is a young and na├»ve university female graduate desperately searching for a job. In her desperation, she ignorantly becomes part of a criminal network involved in drugtrafficking in spite of her friend’s constant warning to keep away from notorious Ochuole. Aloho is arrested and detained for drug trafficking. Upon her release, she suddenly realizes that she is pregnant for Chief Haladu- Amaka and eventually dies during child-birth. The author uses Aloho’s character to portray the ordeals of many young and jobless Nigerian graduates, how they are easily taken advantage of and lured into crime intheir desperation to eke out a living.


Character Analysis and Role of OCHUOLE In Harvest of Corruption

2. OCHUOLE
ochuole is of average height who likes to wear "a tight mini skirt with an equally dark red designer shoes" (p. 1. She is said to be "gregarious... described by her friends as an extrovert" (p. l). Ochuole is free-willed, a bit on the talkative side. Her idea of a city is where "oranges" beg for plucking as soon as "they are ripe" (p. 2). By implication that is just what she has been doing sinee,arriving Jabu, the capital of Jacassa. Her "heydays in the university" (p. 2), to use the words of Aloho, were remarkable for what they were. Aloho was to tell ogeyi about Ochuole when she describes the latter as "that girl who was almost making herself a nuisance on the campus" (p. 8). She had been "that girl who caused a lecturer's suspension for leaking examination papers" (p. 8) Because ochuole's thinking is always centred on plucking "oranges" when she notices "they.are ripe", she has no time for "born-again stuff" (p. 3). She urges Aloho to spare her "anot of your crusade sermons She is one made to eat her cake "and still have it' (p. 3) She is open and clear her friend who arrives the city of Jabu still with traces morality, ochuol advises Aloho: "All you have to do is open your eyes wide not to look at Aso or Zuma rock o" (p. 4)
Ochuole promises Aloho a job and delivers it to her. She promises to "put a word for you (Aloho) to my Minister" because she is very sure "he will not say no" (p. 5)
. She is the Minister's mistress, his confidante, business partner and corrupt outlet. Ochuole is the most influential person in Chief's life who could easily extract money at will from him, and a
been notice too. Although Aloho's designation at work is Protocol Officer, she has simply been employed to be a drug carrier. "My duty", Ochuole informs Madam Hoha "is to convince
(Aloho) to play ball with him (Chief and then the usual commission keeps rolling inWhen she speaks to Chief on Aloho's need for a job, it is like a directive rather than a request "I have assured her that you will employ her" (p. 17)

Ochuole is an astute manipulator. Apart from manipulating Chiefto do her bidding, she subjects Aloho to do her own will. Such is the high-voltage manipulation over Aloho that the latter in tears narrates her ordeal to Ogeyi in these words: "Ogeyi, what pains me most is that in all this drama, I am not even given a chance to choose my own role to play" (p. 58). Almost as Aloho is given the new job, she is quickly asked to travel to the United States with an ill-fated suitcase. The newly employed is astonished and in a protesting voice asks her: "You never mentioned any trip to USA as part of my job. What is all this about?" Ochuole responds: "You wanted a job and here is
one" (p. 41). She cajoles Aloho with "Come on cheer up, now you
have it don't lose it" (p. 4). She reveals to Ogeyi later that she was "even lured into having affair with Chief (p. 58) probably by Ochuole which is why "the very memory ofochuole o the Chief gives me the nightmare" (p. 59)



Character Analysis and Role of CHIEF ADE HALADU-AMAKA In Harvest of Corruption

3. CHIEF ADE HALADU-AMAKA
Ade Amaka (a ka. Chief)
Chief has a protruding stomach that his friends fondly call him "the pregnant chief. He has a round face which is said to be constantly covered with sweat "no matter the weather (p l4). He is said to breathe heavily whether he is awake or asleep. As for his gait, he "walks like a man who has an enlarged scrotum" (p. 14). This no doubt paints a picture of corruption, the image of social decay as represented in one person alone.

He is the Hon. Minister in charge of External Relations. We are never treated to the real nature of his work as a Minister. We see him run after girls, order food and drinks in Akpara Hotel which he also uses as the warehouse for his cocaine deals. He is painted as a spendthrift who asks Madam Hoha to "just serve yourself whatever you want and add the bills" (p. 14) immediately the hotel proprietress complains that he has not been "fair" to her.
He enjoys the warmth of women's company. At Akpara Hotel he orders for "two bottles of big stout," (p. 14) and two mortars ofishi ewu for him and for Ochuole. When Ochuole complains of money to settle her mother's hospital bill, he "draws his portfolio nearer to himself presses the buttons open and pulls out a bundle of money which he throws on her laps" (p. 16.) he sees Aloho, he indicates readiness to give her a job in his Ministry and schedules a meeting at 4 pm in his favourite hotel-Akpara Hotel. We later learn that he puts Aloho in the family way shortly after coming in contact with her Chief is both the grower of corruption and the reaper of its outcome. He briefs the Police Commissioner and Justice odili on basis that they will protect him against the dictates of the law. This way he runs his hard drug business unmolested, and when one of his carriers Aloho is caught at the airport, Justice Odili organizes a Kangaroo hearing and releases the culprit in a matter of days. He divests the Ministry of huge sums of money and converts government workers into his direct servants and agents in his nefarious deals. In the end, he receives a very long term. About to face the law, he loses his nerves. He asks the SSS people who come for him to give him "time to pull" himself together. Earlier, he had tried to be bold by asking them: "Who
are you and who the hell is your Chief that you should come into my office and behave as if the world is in your pockets?" (p. 89) The same loss of nerves is observed when the case is underway. "My Lord," Chief pleads, "I think I want to see a doctor. I am not feeling well'" (p109). When he is about to be sentenced, he pleads for leniency and informs the court that "my entire village and local government depend on me" (p. As if the jail for those who are not married, Chief further pleads, "Show mercy My Lord, I have a family p-l-e-a s e' (p. 118).


Character Analysis and Role of OGEYI In Harvest of Corruption

4. OGEYI
Ogeyi is Aloho’s friend and confidant. Aloho lives with Ogeyi in her small apartment in Pannya. She tries to discourage Aloho from taking Ochuole’s job offer and warns her to keep away from Ochuole. She seeks justice for Aloho by reporting Chief to the police. She is the voice of reason in the play.


Character Analysis and Role of MADAM HOHA In Harvest of Corruption

5. MADAM HOHA
Madam Hoha is the proprietress of Akpara Hotel. The hotel is where Chief perpetuates his criminal activities.She is sentenced to ten years imprisonment with hardlabour along with Ochuole and her hotel was sealed.



Character Analysis and Role of ACP YAKUBU Yakubu In Harvest of Corruption

6. ACP YAKUBU Yakubu is an Assistant Commissioner of Police. He stands out as an incorruptible and honest police officer. He withstood pressures from his boss, the Commissioner to stop investigating Chief’s activities at the Ministry of External Relations. His investigations led to the arrest and prosecution of Chief, Ochuole, Madam Hoha, the Commissioner of Police and the corrupt Justice Odili.

Character Analysis and Role of Ayo In Harvest of Corruption

Ayo (p. 26)
We are introduced to Ayo as a clerk in the Ministry of External Relations. He is a bare-faced liar who claims not to know about the embezzlement in the Ministry until he is bribed hank you. You should
expect me tomorrow evening unfailingly," (p. 28) he assures Inspector lmaka. We are informed that he is "slim and hungry-looking, but well-dressed with a white shirt over apair black trousers and a black tie to match." His front ket is lined with an array of biros of three colours. His shoes are slightly needful of repair at the sides, having been "chopping alignment (p 26. No wonder he quickly accepts a two thousand naira bribe to augment his monthly pay of two thousands five hundred naira take home. An ignorant fellow, in revealing the sleaze in the Ministry after receiving a bribe, Ayo is not aware that he is culpable for exposing official secrets and also for receiving monetary inducement, Dragged to court along with his Minister boss and the latter's accomplices, Ayo receives a five-year jail term for corruption as well. Free with his mouth; he informs Mrs Obi and Alice on what transpires between Aloho and Chief for which Alice calls him a gossip. His significance it the play is the role ho plays in unveiling the goings- on in the Ministry. The Jndge commetids hina for "exposing a crime" but goes ahead to condemn him "for receiving bribe" (p l 19)



Character Analysis and Role of Alice (Tea Gir) In Harvest of Corruption

Alice (Tea Gir)

She is the tea girl in the office of the secretary to the Minister of External Relations. She speaks Pidgin English. The first time she speaks she accuses Ayo, the Clerical officer of being gossipy for which the latter warns and taunts her. Although she is keen to hear Ayo's gossip she is not keen to meet a "man
we de gossip like woman" (p. 77) such as Ayo That way, Ayo accuses her of meddling in his affairs and asks Mrs. Obi to warn her desist from doing so. The gossip is that Alohi, the Protocol Officer,
had been pregnant for "oga (Chief) and had died from abortion Alice is used to typify what happens in government offices in developing country in which must of her time is spent on gossip and tittle-tattles


Character Analysis and Role of Commissioner of Police In Harvest of Corruption

Commissioner of Police (p. 18)
He is said to be "a tall athletic young man of about forty years "dark in complexion, has thin and sender fingers'' and possesses "red lips with black sports his teeth is said to be "broken" and "coloured" probably because he is a chain smoker and an alcohol addict As we meet him first tme, Chief haladu is visiting him just as he did Justice odili with alot of goodies. The law officer is quick to point out to Chief your Ministry is getting some negative and disturbing publicity lately" and reminds his visitor that "nobody loves negative publicity you know This is an interesting comment because he was later to scream at ACP Yakubu with "public opinion my foot!" (p.62) when he sought to underplay Chief's atrocities against his country the comment is also interesting because the Police Commissioner seems to have made in order raise the value of the booty he is to receive from Chief We are informed that as Chief opens his portfolio and brings out bundles of naira notes and places them on the table, the Commissioner grabs them with the agility of lighting and puts them into his drawer (p. 19). Not only does be expect filthy money from Chief, the Commissioner of Police argues for "increased pay" for the "boys" (p. 20) so as to ensure their "absolute loyalty and excellent performance" (p. 21). Like Justice odili, he also asks Chief to be careful by being vague about what he means: "You have to be careful. I have sensed the signal and I know the danger sign when it appears on the dashboard" (p. 21)
The manner he is described which has been briefly referred to shows that the Commissioner has ugly habits, including his tendency to accept bribes. Once he has been mobilized like Justice Odili, he charges along like a lion sensing an attack on his territory. Just as Justice Odili intimidates the Registrar at the kangaroo hearing, Police Commissioner seeks to intimidate ACPYakubu without achieving much success. He warns the ACP to "steer clear of that Ministry or any other Ministry for that matter or you will be biting more than you can chew" (p. 62). But the ACP, sure-footed, fires back: "Sir, you cannot threaten me and do not bother at what hits me but I shall ask you this, since only those who have skeletons in their cupboard need fear" (p. 63).
The Commissioner and Justice Odili, each an agent of the law, are shown to be drawbacks to the law. It is people like them who weaken the law and prepare the way for corrupt people to evade the law. Both of them receive most the venom of the Judge at the court as he calls them "a big disgrace to our noble profession" (p. 119). The Judge accuses both of them of greed before sentencing each of them to twenty years with hard labour. They both represent agents of the law who work at cross-purposes with what society expects of them, and cause impunity to continue to reign.


Character Analysis and Role of Constable Ojo In Harvest of Corruption

Constable Ojo (p. 54)
A lanky-looking young man possessing an athletic figure, Constable Ojo has very small eyes "which are hidden inside the sockets." We are told that when the Constable looks at a person "there is an uneasy feeling that penetrates through the person's very soul." He is often smartly dressed and "has the knack for breaking seemingly mysterious cases
(p. 54). He works with ACP Yakubu whom he observes as the latter talks to himself in a soliloquy as to the level of in society where "any or highly placed individuals will and can toy with the judiciary and get away with any crime committed Constable ojo in return is equally surprised that at the trial of Aloho for cocaine pushing, "the state prosecutor and the defence counsels both absent at the different times the case came up (p. 55). He is deployed in the play to show that the impunity exercised by Chief and his clique rattles the top (ACP Yakubu) intermediate (inspector inaku) and the low level (Constable ojo) policemen in Jacassa for which something has to be done, and pretty soon too.


Character Analysis and Role of Customs officer In Harvest of Corruption

Customs officer
Like Constable ojo, the customs oficer appears briefly too. He works at the airport and is the fellow who accosts Aloho with the suitcase of cocaine. Described by Chief as "that good-for-nothing Customs officer' (p. 48) because the latter does his job as he is supposed to and her contraband and promises to hand her over to JDLEA (acassa Drug Law Enforcement Agency). He announces to Aloho that she is carrying cocaine. He advises patience as she will enough time to call whoever you want later" By pulling out of chief's corrupt ring and exposing Chief's agent, the customs officer shows that it is better to side with society than with debased individuals.


Character Analysis and Role of Defence Counsel In Harvest of Corruption

Defence Counsel (p. 96)
He is said to be a tall, slim young man in white wig He pleads "Not guilty" for Chief, being his Defence Counsel. He is an astute lawyer who asks the proper questions in order to dismiss his client s charges. He questions the manner the Detective used to extract information for prosecuting the case. When the Prosecution objects, the Judge cries "objection sustained" (p. 101). All his subsequent objections" are unsustained by the Judge. Through his questions Ogeyi is able to give the details she knew about Chief and his collaborators. The Defence Counsel accuses Ogeyi of being "jealous of the fact that your friend (Aloho) was always coming home with plenty of money and gifts from Chief, the Honourable Minister" (p. 104). This comment draws tears from Ogeyi's eyes for which the Prosecution Counsel prays the Judge to restrain the Defence Counsel "from further vulgarism and insinuations (p. 105). As if he was meeting his client (Chief Haladu) for the first time, the Defence Counsel begins to ask him personal questions which soon irritate the Judge: "Don't continue to waste the time of the Court by (p. basis for those personal questions is to show that Chief, his client, is a man who has served the government o his country in one of the most enviable of a Minister..." (p. 110). He claims that "everybody has been satisfied and his staff in the Ministry speak eloquently of his magnanimity, generosity and 110). When he realizes that clients have been declared "guilty", he pleads both "elemency" and option of fine" (p116) The type of punishment meted out to Chief and his accomplices shows that the Judge does not reckon with the Defence Counsel's line of argument.



Character Analysis and Role of Doctor In Harvest of Corruption

Doctor (p. 65)
He is a young man of thirty-five, light-complexioned and slightly bald-headed. He works in Wazobia Hospital in Mabu. It is to him that Aloho goes for abortion when she discovers that she is Rather than contact Chief, she goes straight to this doctor with his fee in her handbag. He is reluctant to carry out the abortion of Aloho's pregnancy but does not reveal this until he had collected the large sum often thousand naira from his patient. It is after this ritual of money exchanging hands that he now asks Aloho if she wants to kill herself by insisting on the pregnancy ofthree months being suddenly aborted.
He postpones the abortion exercise a few times and on one occasion he was almost about to carry out the exercise when Nurse Halimatu rushes in to declare an emergency. From the Doctor's initial reluctance, it is safe to infer that he had arranged this "emergency" with Halimatu. Thus, the Doctor's dilly-dallying strategy stops the abortion and compels Aloho to have her baby, a girl. ordinarily Doctor is pro-life; however, his morality is questionable since he pocketsAloho's ten thousand naira fee without completing the contract between them. His dishonesty is evidenced by his asking Nurse Halimatu to leave us now and please if anybody asks of me, say I am not in, okay!" (p. 75)



Character Analysis and Role of Inspector Inaku In Harvest of Corruption

Inspector Inaku
Inspector Inaku is a detective dressed in mufti. His full name is John Odey Inaku who is a Detective Inspector in the Criminal Investigation Department of the Jacassan Police Force. In his determination to convict Chief and his accomplices, he obtains his evidence against them by bribing Ayo to secure the relevant documents. He secures Ogeyi's story with his "little tape-recorder gesturing for her to speak" (pp. 80-81). In court, he is firm and professional in the manner he presents his case against Chief and his cohorts which must have compelled the court to accept his evidence. Inaku gives the detailed information about Chief, his accessories and Ayo who accepts a bribe of two thousand naira in order to part with documents necessary for the case to be successfully prosecuted. Not withstanding Ayo's usefulness in the suit, he is prosecuted along with the other criminals.

Character Analysis and Role of Judge In Harvest of Corruption

Judge
This Judge is different from Justice odili. He is a devoted law officer who is only out to do justice. He is sprite and business-like. He is keen to get to the heart of the matter as soon as it is possible. "What are the facts of the case?" (p. 96) he asks the Prosecution Counsel once the Defence Counsel submits a "not guilty" plea. At no point does he interrupt either the Defence Counsel or the Prosecution Counsel from explaining their positions fully. However, each time there is a triviality being pursued, particularly by the Defence Counsel, he steps in to nip it in the bud. He overrules unnecessary objections, insists on explicitness in the "choice of words" (p. 103) and demands that all points raised be apposite and relevant. A few times he is humorous in court without losing focus nor fails to ask the necessary questions to move the case forward. His remark before the Jury goes out to give their verdict shows that he stands for justice and fairness. He reminds the jury that "corruption is not a friendly word to the legal institution, therefore anybody who plants corruption should be ready to harvest it' (p. 114) He charges the jury to bear in mind that "justice comes first" (p. 115). In the end, the Judge fearlessly announces the verdict of the jury and goes on to impose the sentences accordingly.



Character Analysis and Role of Lady
In Harvest of Corruption

Lady
She is not described; he only stops on sighting the madman, calling him "Showboy!" she advises the madman against "disturbing the neighbourhood with your noise She asks the insane man to "stop your noise or else I shall call Police to arrest you for noisemaking and stealing from the neighbourhood" (p. 24). Although it is not clear if the madman has her in mind when he claims that "she used to be my darling wife wen I poor", her saying "when you are poor again you can come and marry me" (p. 25) indicates that the lady believes she is the one being referred to. She describes what "Showboy" is saying as "nonsense" and declares, "I can't waste my time listening to you" (p. 25).


Character Analysis and Role of Madman In Harvest of Corruption

Madman
Called "Showboy" by Lady, madman is said to be dressed in tattered clothes and is "carrying a heavy bundle of tightly wrapped bits and pieces of junk drooping over his face He creates a scene by screaming and abusing no one in particular, while laughing from time to time. He addresses no particular audience when he says: "All of you there" (p. 23). Although his remarks seem uncoordinated they leave a lasting impression on ACP Yakubu. He says, for instance, "I be rich, I be rich man but I never steal anybody property." He also says that he is a rich man "as you see me. I dress fine" (p. 23). If appointed a President by the current President (which is a madman's talk) he will "run dis country well. No stealing" (p. 24). Moreover, he is interested in sanitation, "yes! Evrometa. Yes! Na sanitation we need abi na evrometa by ourselves not de country" (pp. 24-25). What the madman says impels ACP Yakubu into deep thought; the Assistant Commissioner considers the madman as having prescribed a cure for the country's "madness and lawlessness" (p. 25). The madman is a metaphor for the confused state, corruption and value overthrow in Jacassa.

Character Analysis and Role of Madam Hoha In Harvest of Corruption

Madam Hoha
The proprietress of Akpara Hotel at Darkin, she is among Chief's accomplices. She is tall, bulky and "seems to be having a lot out of life" (p. 11). Her skin is said to be velvety, not too light and not too dark but "could pass for ebony description." A well-fed "cash madam", she has "achieved some degree of wealth." The playwright describes her looks as those of "the familiar sight of an eastern Jacassan woman of high society." On both hands there are gold bracelets and on her four fingers gold rings with both cheeks lined by "three parallel marks, which look like the whiskers of a cat' (p. 11). She calls ochuole "the chic", the Lioness" and "Bubbling Baby" and in a moment she gossips about Chief and how his likes will "never regret their retirement because of the chain of companies they float" (p From her comments on the Chief and his ilk and how "all they do is stashing government money somewhere through some conduit pipes for the rainy day" (p. 2), it is clear that she is into abetting Chief in his nefarious activities with her two eyes wide open. It also shows that Madam Hoha is a reckless commentator who does not weigh what she says. Making all that remark against the Chief in front of his mistress shows that indeed she speaks "hoha', meaning without restraint. She has a low opinion of Chief who will easily fall when "we'll dangle this babe (Aloho) before the Chief for a price" after all he will employ her and we can make use of her to get what we want" (p. 13) When she is called "Madam de Madam" by Chief, she responds "It's a matter of cash, Chief" (p l4. Chief orders for drinks and two mortars of ishi-ewu for him and ochuole, Madam Hoha that "she her own. When she receives her largesse, she then yields to Chief joining his girl, and remarks is dying have you already" (p. 15). Madam Hoha's Akpara Hotel is Chief's tryst with his lovers. He
tells Madam Hoha that his girls "are supposed to be here waiting for me and not the other way round" (p. 38). Although we treat her here as a minor character because of her limited role in the play she receives a similar as Ochuole's, having been described as having an insatiable appetit money. Her hotel is thus sealed up "as we cannot continue to be operating havens for criminal activities under the guise of beer parlours (p. 120).


Character Analysis and Role of Market Woman In Harvest of Corruption

Market Woman
We meet her in Wusa Market where she sells rice of various types- Gwari, Nupe and Uncle Ben's. She beats the price of Gwari rice with Ogeyi until they both agree on eighty naira per mudu. An illiterate woman, she speaks Pidgin English like Alice, the tea girl. She is used by the playwright to show how Ogeyi wisely uses her money in spite of the "little pay" which still compels everyone "to buy in the same market with everybody" (p. 70).



Character Analysis and Role of Mrs Obi In Harvest of Corruption

Mrs Obi

Chief's secretary, Mrs Obi is a lady of average height, "slim with a good figure." She has on a pair of eyeglasses and is said to be light-complexioned. She is aware that Ochuole is a staff of the Ministry and is close to the Minister but she still insists on the protocol of how to see the Minister, yet without pretending to "risk it" (p. 31). Although Chief has instructed that no one sees him before 12 noon, Mrs Obi violates this rule since she knows the relationship between her boss and young women. Through her we know a bit about the Minister as one who violates his own instructions, and one who fails to follow protocol once women are concerned. Apparently Mrs obi hears little, quite ignorant of what is going on in their office until Ayo gossips to her. Informed that "Madam Aloho" has been caught at the.airport for cocaine-pushing and is "pregnant for oga (Chief, Mrs Obi snaps her fingers and remarks: thought as much. I know that all these games that have been going on will one to light" (p. 79). She describes her boss as "poor man" even as she thinks that he deserves whatever is coming to him whatever a man sows, same shall he reap. I pity (p. 79). Yet when the Sss men come for Chief, she bursts into his office, panting. She senses trouble for Chief bat e latter to be calm about it until he knows that his time is up.


Character Analysis and Role of Nurse Halimatu In Harvest of Corruption

Nurse Galimatu
A nursing sister, Halimatu works with Doctor in the Wazobia Hospital in Mabu. As the play Scene Five is dressed in "well-standard white apron with a stopwatch and biros of two different
colours decorating the front left breast pocket She has three tribal marks on each of her cheeks, is dark-complexioned and of average height. She is a cautious nurse who speaks to patients in a gentle voice. She is unpretentious and apologizes to Aloho for not recognizing her when next the latter shows up. She is obedient to Doctor and comes to inform him of an emergency when Aloho is about to be handled in the abortion theatre. It is not clear if she precipitated the emergency or not; it is not clear if it had been a ploy since we had read some reluctance on the part of the Doctor to abort Aloho's baby.


Character Analysis and Role of okpotu In Harvest of Corruption

okpotu (p. 90) Twenty-two years old, he is dark complexioned and has three tribal marks on each of his cheeks. He is Aloho's younger brother who comes into Jabu to see Ogeyi from his village. He brings the news of the death of Aloho and the survival of her baby girl. Okpotu is sent to Ogeyi by his father who would want to know the name of the man who had impregnated his daughter. He speaks in a conciliatory tone which suggests that he is not a trouble maker. Rather than be emotional that his sister had died, he asks Ogeyi who is sobbing on hearing Aloho's death to pull herself together, saying, "We all miss her. What can we relations reach Ogeyi whose name she continued to call until she gave up the ghost. He is a grateful fellow who thanks Ogeyi for "all that you did for my sister while she was alive" (p. 92). Without his appearance, it would have been difficult to have the full perspective of the Aloho subplot of the play. namely that she later had a baby, never forgot ogeyi and died thereafter.

Character Analysis and Role of Registrar In Harvest of Corruption

Registrar
It is not clear if it is the same Registrar we meet at the cocaine trial as the one we meet at the Chief and his cohorts' assizes in Scene Eight. The Registrar we meet in Scene Three is a stout-looking, elderly man who is dressed in an "Elizabethan age" coat considered to be undersized for his build. Justice Odili asks him to call the first case of the day which he quickly does. Just for saying that the Prosecutor of the case is not present while the defendant's counsels are in court, Justice Odili takes umbrage at him. "Look here, Mr Registrar," Justice odili barks at him, "next time when I ask a question, I expecta direct answer" (p. 51). When next he reminds "My Lord" that the "state prosecutor came to your chamber this morn he is warned "to speak only when you are spoken to." Justice odili goes on to belittle him insisting that he should not "tell all that you see." The reason is that "you may not be able to explain the differences between what you actually see and what you imagined you saw" (p. 52). In Scene Eight the Judge treats him with more respect. There are no threats as he calls out Chief Haladu Ade-Amaka and five others. He reads out Chief's offences without any interruption and asks the jury if they are agreed on the verdict of "guilty" arrived at in the case of Chief and five others to which the Foreman of the Jury responds, "We are agreed'' (p. 116). It is the Registrar that addresses the accused persons and announces what they are convicted of: he it is too who seeks to know if any of them has reasons "why the court should not give you judgement according to the law"
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Roles of Chief Ade Haladu Amaka in Harvest of corruption

Character Analysis and Role of CHIEF ADE HALADU-AMAKA In Harvest of Corruption

CHIEF ADE HALADU-AMAKA
Ade Amaka (a ka. Chief)
Chief has a protruding stomach that his friends fondly call him "the pregnant chief. He has a round face which is said to be constantly covered with sweat "no matter the weather (p l4). He is said to breathe heavily whether he is awake or asleep. As for his gait, he "walks like a man who has an enlarged scrotum" (p. 14). This no doubt paints a picture of corruption, the image of social decay as represented in one person alone.

He is the Hon. Minister in charge of External Relations. We are never treated to the real nature of his work as a Minister. We see him run after girls, order food and drinks in Akpara Hotel which he also uses as the warehouse for his cocaine deals. He is painted as a spendthrift who asks Madam Hoha to "just serve yourself whatever you want and add the bills" (p. 14) immediately the hotel proprietress complains that he has not been "fair" to her.
He enjoys the warmth of women's company. At Akpara Hotel he orders for "two bottles of big stout," (p. 14) and two mortars ofishi ewu for him and for Ochuole. When Ochuole complains of money to settle her mother's hospital bill, he "draws his portfolio nearer to himself presses the buttons open and pulls out a bundle of money which he throws on her laps" (p. 16.) he sees Aloho, he indicates readiness to give her a job in his Ministry and schedules a meeting at 4 pm in his favourite hotel-Akpara Hotel. We later learn that he puts Aloho in the family way shortly after coming in contact with her Chief is both the grower of corruption and the reaper of its outcome. He briefs the Police Commissioner and Justice odili on basis that they will protect him against the dictates of the law. This way he runs his hard drug business unmolested, and when one of his carriers Aloho is caught at the airport, Justice Odili organizes a Kangaroo hearing and releases the culprit in a matter of days. He divests the Ministry of huge sums of money and converts government workers into his direct servants and agents in his nefarious deals. In the end, he receives a very long term. About to face the law, he loses his nerves. He asks the SSS people who come for him to give him "time to pull" himself together. Earlier, he had tried to be bold by asking them: "Who
are you and who the hell is your Chief that you should come into my office and behave as if the world is in your pockets?" (p. 89) The same loss of nerves is observed when the case is underway. "My Lord," Chief pleads, "I think I want to see a doctor. I am not feeling well'" (p109). When he is about to be sentenced, he pleads for leniency and informs the court that "my entire village and local government depend on me" (p. As if the jail for those who are not married, Chief further pleads, "Show mercy My Lord, I have a family p-l-e-a s e' (p. 118).
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Role and analysis of ochuole in harvest of corruption

Character Analysis and Role of OCHUOLE In Harvest of Corruption

2. OCHUOLE
ochuole is of average height who likes to wear "a tight mini skirt with an equally dark red designer shoes" (p. 1. She is said to be "gregarious... described by her friends as an extrovert" (p. l). Ochuole is free-willed, a bit on the talkative side. Her idea of a city is where "oranges" beg for plucking as soon as "they are ripe" (p. 2). By implication that is just what she has been doing sinee,arriving Jabu, the capital of Jacassa. Her "heydays in the university" (p. 2), to use the words of Aloho, were remarkable for what they were. Aloho was to tell ogeyi about Ochuole when she describes the latter as "that girl who was almost making herself a nuisance on the campus" (p. 8). She had been "that girl who caused a lecturer's suspension for leaking examination papers" (p. 8) Because ochuole's thinking is always centred on plucking "oranges" when she notices "they.are ripe", she has no time for "born-again stuff" (p. 3). She urges Aloho to spare her "anot of your crusade sermons She is one made to eat her cake "and still have it' (p. 3) She is open and clear her friend who arrives the city of Jabu still with traces morality, ochuol advises Aloho: "All you have to do is open your eyes wide not to look at Aso or Zuma rock o" (p. 4)
Ochuole promises Aloho a job and delivers it to her. She promises to "put a word for you (Aloho) to my Minister" because she is very sure "he will not say no" (p. 5)

. She is the Minister's mistress, his confidante, business partner and corrupt outlet. Ochuole is the most influential person in Chief's life who could easily extract money at will from him, and a
been notice too. Although Aloho's designation at work is Protocol Officer, she has simply been employed to be a drug carrier. "My duty", Ochuole informs Madam Hoha "is to convince
(Aloho) to play ball with him (Chief and then the usual commission keeps rolling inWhen she speaks to Chief on Aloho's need for a job, it is like a directive rather than a request "I have assured her that you will employ her" (p. 17)

Ochuole is an astute manipulator. Apart from manipulating Chiefto do her bidding, she subjects Aloho to do her own will. Such is the high-voltage manipulation over Aloho that the latter in tears narrates her ordeal to Ogeyi in these words: "Ogeyi, what pains me most is that in all this drama, I am not even given a chance to choose my own role to play" (p. 58). Almost as Aloho is given the new job, she is quickly asked to travel to the United States with an ill-fated suitcase. The newly employed is astonished and in a protesting voice asks her: "You never mentioned any trip to USA as part of my job. What is all this about?" Ochuole responds: "You wanted a job and here is
one" (p. 41). She cajoles Aloho with "Come on cheer up, now you
have it don't lose it" (p. 4). She reveals to Ogeyi later that she was "even lured into having affair with Chief (p. 58) probably by Ochuole which is why "the very memory ofochuole o the Chief gives me the nightmare" (p. 59)
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